Dual Booting  Windows Vista & Windows XP

System Restore points and other recovery features in Windows Vista are affected when you dual-boot with Windows XP

 

The problem:

 

Windows XP automounts every disk it detects, including external or removable hard disks. As part of the automounting process, NTFS writes to the disk, and these writes are detected by the volsnap.sys driver in Windows XP. Because this version of volsnap.sys does not recognize the persistent shadow copies (also known as restore points) made by the volsnap.sys driver in Windows Vista, Windows XP cannot maintain the integrity of the shadow copy storage area and deletes the shadow copies to avoid corrupting them. Note that dual-booting Windows Vista with Windows Server 2003 or Windows XP Professional x64 Edition will also result in the shadow copies being deleted.

 

The impact:

 

When booting into Windows XP and automounting a disk, you will notice the following effects on the disk after booting back to Windows Vista:

  • All restore points are deleted from the disk.
  • All previous versions of files are deleted from the disk.
  • All but the most recent CompletePC Backups are deleted from the disk. The remaining backup made by CompletePC Backup is full and complete and can be used to restore your entire computer.

File backups are not affected because these backups do not rely on restore points.

 

The workarounds:

Warning: Read these two articles before creating partitions when dual-booting Window XP & Vista!!!

The partition that hosts Windows Vista may disappear if you use Windows XP to create a partition on a computer that has both Windows XP and Windows Vista installed

 

A more in-depth analysis on disappearing partitions by Walter Clayton MS-MVP

Related Articls

 

Dual booting Windows XP

 

No restore points are available when you use Windows Vista in a dual-boot configuration together with an earlier Windows operating system

 

How restore points and other recovery features in Windows Vista are affected when you dual-boot with Windows XP

 

Windows Vista no longer starts after you install an earlier version of the Windows operating system in a dual-boot configuration

 

In a dual-boot configuration, Windows XP does not start if you subsequently format or delete the partition on which Windows Vista is installed

 

You cannot start Windows XP after you install Windows Vista in a dual-boot configuration together with Windows XP

 

The computer continuously restarts after you unsuccessfully try to install Windows Vista on a Windows-based computer

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Friday, October 23, 2009

 

Start Date 2/27/05


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